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ddeanjohnson
08-16-2012, 02:02 AM
I am a small-time collector/accumulator who recently acquired this single-shot falling block "free pistol." I would like to learn more about whoever made it, and when it was made.

This imprint appears on the left side left side of falling block: D.R.G.M.
I have read that DRGM means Deutsches Reich Gebrauchsmuster (German Reich Registered Design), designating a patent registration with the government government of the period in which this pistol was manufactured.

Imprinted on the left side of the barrel: G. Will, Schwerin I/M.

Also imprinted on the left side of the barrel:
0,2gr N.G.P. M/71
It is my understanding that NGP means Nitrozellulose Gewehr Pulver (nitrocellulose rifle powder), and that M/71 was a Mauser powder.

Proofmarks: crown B, crown U

The pistol has a set trigger and a lanyard ring.

Thank you for any additional information that you can provide, especially anything about "G. Wise."

A friend, who is a professional photographer, took some excellent photos of the pistol, which I will endeavor to link here.

D. Dean Johnson

mike ford
08-16-2012, 11:00 PM
Dean,
NGPm/71 means Neues Gewehr-pulver Modell 71(New Rifle-Powder Model 71). This was the official black powder then in use by the German Army. The crown B indicates a single definitive proof made with the provisional proof charge (chiefly applied to imported arms). The crown U is the mark for the View Proof, which was really a detailed inspection. The photos didn't clearly show the proof marks. If you could separate them and send clear photos of the marks, it is possible that additional information could be provided. Axel,Raimey,or Jon will be better able to address "G.Wise".
Mike

ddeanjohnson
08-17-2012, 02:34 PM
I have posted three additional photos that show the imprints.

mike ford
08-17-2012, 05:28 PM
Dean,
The marks I thought might be helpful would be under the barrel, in all likelyhood. It would be necessary to remove the barrel and action from the stock to see them.
Mike

ddeanjohnson
08-22-2012, 02:38 AM
There are no additional imprints under the barrel. So, does anybody out there have any information whatever on Mr. "G. Wise" or his patent(s)?

ellenbr
08-22-2012, 02:39 PM
Concur with Ford in that you are still missing some elementary proof stamps like the "Crown" over "G" and the pre-rifled bore diameter, which will be on the tube somewhere. You show the voluntary powder stamp. I have searched for a DRGM for either Will or Wise and can't find one for either but I had thought the search to be a red herring. Really need the DRGM number to make a stab at it & I would guess it lies with E.F. Büchel. I'm all but positive he had a sack full of patents and I've found DRGMs 327045 & 327897 right off. Some variants looks to be stamped with DRMS instead of DRGM. I would hazard a guess it is some Tell variant of the Büchel Model II and the DRGM might lie with the concern or Cuno Büchel. Oscar Will(Venus Waffenwerk), Friedrich Langenhan, others were attempting to corner the Scheibenpistole market.

http://i697.photobucket.com/albums/vv337/ellenbrs/bucheltellModel27fbf1e65daf1db745e552bb0db45256c.j pg

http://www.classicmilitaryguns.com/page9.php

Kind Regards,

Raimey
rse

ellenbr
08-22-2012, 03:34 PM
http://i697.photobucket.com/albums/vv337/ellenbrs/bchelpistolvariants1907-1.jpg

http://i697.photobucket.com/albums/vv337/ellenbrs/bcheltellpistolvariants1907-1.jpg

Some Büchel variants

Kind Regards,

Raimey
rse

Axel E
09-09-2012, 05:46 PM
dd..., as you noted, your pistol was retailed not by "G.Wise", but by "G.Will". Gustav Will was a country gunsmith at Schwerin in Mecklenburg, capital of that German state and harbour city on the Baltic Sea. Gustav Will is mentioned as a distributor for Teschner-Collath in 1916. In 1921 son Erich Will became master and took over. 0.2 gramm = blackpowder M71 was the official service load for the .22 short pre-WW1, so the pistol was proofed for that cartridge, the standard target number before the great war. It may have been rechambered later, but .22 chambers were often quite "generous" up to 1939. F.i. most "6mm Flobert" (= .22 BB cap) marked rifles, which could be bought, carried and used free of licence under former German gun laws, readily accept .22 short, long, long rifle and even extra long cartridges. I too believe it to be a variant of the Büchel Tell design, with the grip positioned like those of the then new Borchard and Luger pistols. IMHO you should consult Tom Rowe's book "Alte Scheibenwaffen Vol. III", available from the GGCA bookstore. To get at the more important proofmarks, that may even allow dating the gun to the month, you have to take the barreled action out of the stock and have a look at the underside of the barrel.

ddeanjohnson
05-15-2013, 11:23 AM
I was ultimately able to identify this pistol as the "Model 1911" by E.F. Buchel. The action was known as the "Winkelblock." This was a precursor to Buchel's later and better known "Tell" models.