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Thread: New Forum Member

  1. #1
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2016
    Posts
    2

    New Forum Member

    Hi,

    My Name is David DePascal from Metairie, Louisiana. I wanted a Sxs to hunt quail and found a Thieme & Schlegelmilch that I just couldn't pass up.(Must be the little bit of German in me I guess) This forum and www.germanhuntingguns.com helped me decide to get this shotgun. Its a 16Ga SxS from 1931 with 65mm chambers, lots of patina but the bores are bright and locks tight. Looking forward to doing some hunting once the polywads come in.

    Thanks
    David.

  2. #2
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2011
    Location
    East Alabama
    Posts
    1,725
    David,
    Welcome, we are glad to have you with us. We have members that seem to share your interest in Thieme & Schlegelmich guns and I'm sure they would be happy if you posted photos of yours.
    Mike

  3. #3

  4. #4
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2011
    Location
    East Alabama
    Posts
    1,725
    David,
    I'm sure members that have T&S guns, will enjoy the photos of yours. One of the things you will find out about this site is that it is almost always necessary to post photos of the markings, including proof marks, to find out as much as possible about the gun(s) in question.
    Mike

  5. #5
    David:

    I like your gun ! You're going to really enjoy it.

    John

  6. #6
    David:

    I like your gun ! You're going to really enjoy it.

    John

  7. #7
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Posts
    900
    Welcome on board, David! Some finer points of your new Thieme & Schlegelmilch "Nimrod" trademark sideplated boxlock shotgun:
    First, it has the "Nimrod – Verschluss" = Nimrod lockup, the interlocking steps under barrels and on watertable. Meant by T&S to take the asymmetrical force when the barrels are fired. A questionable T&S peculiarity.
    Second, more interesting is the unique Nimrod lockwork. It is nearly hand detachable for inspection, cleaning and oiling. Here is an old T&S ad showing the details:

    The locks should be cocked. After removing the sideplates with a screwdriver you have full access to mainspring , sear and hammer. The inverted V spring serves both hammer and sear. Inletted into the wood you will find a small clamp, a in the ad drawing. (If not "lost in transit") Place his clamp over the lower arms of the spring. Pull the trigger and let the hammer forward. You now may remove clamp and spring. After removing the spring, sear and hammer may be lifted out. Reassemble in reverse order, but cock the gun again before trying to remove the clamp.
    The geometry of the Nimrod lock is novel and very advanced too. Hammer and spring are set up in such a way that the spring exerts it's power to the cocked hammer through an almost straight toggle joint. So the spring applies little force to the fully cocked hammer, but the force increases constantly through the fall of the hammer. The sear engages the hammer far from the hammer's fulcrum. So there is only little pressure on the sear detent when the locks are at full cock. This makes up a very safe engagement and a light release. The crutch of a safety sear is unneeded on the Nimrod locks. Here in Germany many people regard the Nimrod lock as one of the best lock designs ever made, Germany, Britain or elsewhere.

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