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Thread: Looking for Info on 1934? Drilling

  1. #1
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    Looking for Info on 1934? Drilling

    Hello, This is my first post. I recently received my Father's drilling. I remember handling this gun almost 50 years ago as I kid. It is a treasure to me. Now I am very interested in finding out whatever I can about it's origin. I looked around on the web but was unable to find anything on the two names in the barrel. I will attach some photos to assist. I would greatly appreciate any help that I can get and I have more pics.
    Attached Images Attached Images

  2. #2
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    brookie,
    I'm guessing your father brought this drilling back from WW2( or at least got it from someone that did). The fact that he kept it all these years is reason enough to treasure it. The "BRUNO HAUSSNER(HAEUSSNER)" is the dealer that sold it. The "MAGDEBURG" was the city in which the dealer was located. I can tell that you tried to highlight the markings. Unfortunately, I still can't make the most important ones out. It seems to be caused by a combination of the "white" and the flash, causing glare. These are the markings on the rifle barrel. The ones I can make out on the shotgun barrels show it was proofed for shot( crown S). The crown W shows the barrel is choked, but not the amount of choke. The crown U is the mark for a "View" proof, which is a detailed inspection. The 16 in a circle, shows it has the standard 16 gauge chamber, which was 65mm at the time. This is not the current standard length of 2 3/4", rather it is a shorter 2 1/2- 2 9/16". The 16/1 (not in a circle) is the bore diameter ahead of the chamber, expressed in gauge measurement. Underlever actions like this are often called Roux actions, although not exactly true Roux. If you can provide clear photos or at least describe the marks on the rifle barrel, I can give additional information. By the number of marks I can see, it looks like the drilling was proofed in Zella-Mehlis, before 1912( 1903?, 08?). This would be verified if you can find the word "Nitro" written in script. If written in block letters, it would have likely been proofed in Suhl, instead. If it was proofed prior to 1912, it may have the bore ( not groove or bullet)diameter expressed in gauge measurement. To determine the nominal caliber, it may be necessary to make( or have made) a chamber cast. and "slug" the bore. I hope this has been, at least, some help.
    Mike

  3. #3
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    By copy and paste, turning and enlarging I was able to read the proofmarks. The drilling was proofed in Zella –Mehlis 10.03 = October 1903 as gun number 823 proofed that month. So you don't need to look for a word "Nitro", introduced by Z-M in 1911, Suhl 1912. The gauge number, used by the Zella – Mehlis proofhouse until 1910, is 118.35 = .340 - .350". This points to an originally blackpowder 9.3 mm cartridge, likely a 9.3x72R. But cartridge and chamber dimensions and shapes were only "normalized", standardized from 1909 on, so a chamber cast is a must here.
    The gauge number is stamped over a "circled H" maker's mark, maybe Haeussler's own or one of the many Z-M Hengelhaupts or Helfrichts.
    1934 is not a date, but a serial number.
    The Häussner Gunshop in Magdeburg was founded by a A. Haeussner in 1860. By 1900 it was run by son(?) Bruno Haeussner. Addresses changed over the years, Alte Ulrichstr.8, then Kantstr.5 in 1910, 1935 Goethestr.3.
    The scope bases were added much later, 1920s to 30s. It's a Suhl claw mount for a mount variant once made by A.W. Triebel, Suhl. Rather hopeless to find tops to fit these bases. Even the modern Suhl gunmakers had never seen such a thing until I showed them.
    As the drilling was modernized by mounting a scope post-WW1, it was likely normalized then too to take the still (sometimes) available 9.3x72R Normal.

  4. #4
    Hello
    Here´s what the Häussner-establishment offered in 1874.
    DieBüchsenmachereivonAHäussnerMagdeburgKladderadatsch1874-1.jpg

    Kind regards
    Peter

  5. #5
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    Mike, Axel & Peter, Thank all of you so much for taking the time to help me find some info on this gun. Your knowledge on the subject is impressive and appreciated. I could have spent months or years walking around gun shows until I found this much information. The web can be a wonderful thing. It's hard to believe that a craftsman of the caliber needed to make guns of this quality would not clearly mark their work. Is there any way to be sure of the maker?

    Thanks again for the help

  6. #6
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    Mike, Axel & Peter, Thank all of you so much for taking the time to help me find some info on this gun. Your knowledge on the subject is impressive and appreciated. I could have spent months or years walking around gun shows until I found this much information. The web can be a wonderful thing. It's hard to believe that a craftsman of the caliber needed to make guns of this quality would not clearly mark their work. Is there any way to be sure of the maker?

    Thanks again for the help

  7. #7
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    brookie,
    This drilling would have been made for "the trade", and would not have been clearly marked, for the reason to allow the dealer to mark it with his name. It may be marked and we just can't see(in the photos) or recognize the mark. It will be marked by individual craftsmen that worked on it but, with very few exceptions, we can't ID them today.
    Mike

  8. #8
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    Mike, Thanks for the reply. I will record the information you and Axel have provided and keep it with the gun which I plan to pass on to my nephew who I have been taking shooting since he was about 10.
    Thanks again
    Mike

  9. #9
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    brookie,
    Good for you! It was my favorite uncle that got me interested in guns/working on them/handloading, etc. There is a special place in Heaven for people like you and him(he is already there).
    Mike

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