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Thread: Gentlemen: I too have inherited an old Drilling shotgun

  1. #11
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    Ford of course is a non-believer in that we can narrow the choices for the "H.S." mechanic to a pool of craftsmen with a probability modell There was Hermann Schilling, Ernst Hermann Schilling, Heinrich Schilling & Hugo Schilling and possibly others. But "H.S." is not confined just to the Schilling klan & it could have been some other "H.S." mechanic like Hermann Schlegelmilch and a whole host more. But with the brace of touchmarks of a S in a Chevron, it is highly possible that a Schilling was involved in the whole process. There many be additional marks on the frame & elsewhere that would narrow the pool of mechanics. Triggerplate actions were a pricepoint or cheaper measure & somewhat of a stopgap measure until Anson & Deeley's protection period expired and then came along the A&D Body Action drilling followed by the Suhl staple of the Kerner-Anson Action Body drilling.

    Cheers,

    Raimey
    rse

  2. #12
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    Another tid-bit of info I neglected to mention that one sees the initials "H.S." on many or one might say most of Valentin Christian Schilling's pattern welded tube offerings. I seem to recall that Heinrich Schilling was at the same addresss or very close to that of V. Chr. Schlling V. Chr. Schilling could have easily have had a subcontractor with the initials "H.S.", being a non-Schilling. But the preponderance of evidence does have its thumb on the H. Schilling side of the scales.

    Cheers,

    Raimey
    rse
    Last edited by ellenbr; 08-16-2017 at 01:22 AM.

  3. #13
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    Hello

    Here’s an image of HS/SH on a Greifelt Hammerless Drilling which passed the facility in Suhl in 1928

    012.jpg

    It also has the marking for "des Reichsverbandes deutscher Büchsenmacher, Waffen- und Munitionshändler" on it

    011.jpg

    I've also seen HS on the rifle barrel of another Greifelt Drilling.

    Also, in 1930 the Greifelt establishment seems not to have been a member of the above mentioned Reichverband(es). They could of course have been in 1928 but of that I know nothing.

    Kind regards
    Peter

  4. #14
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    Many thanks for feeding the beast there Moose Snoot, but that HS on the triggerguard bow may have been the owner, not the tubeset knitter. I've seen HS many times and more than likely there were a couple generations of HS tubset knitters(pattern welded & fluid steel) & at least 1 HS family of mechanics @ each weapons making centres.

    Cheers,

    Raimey
    rse

  5. #15
    I would say your drilling is unique. It is certainly uncommon. The stock maker put the cartridge trap on the wrong side!
    www.myersarms.com

    Looking for Mauser tools and catalogs.

  6. #16
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    Nathaniel,
    There are different advantages for putting the trap on either side. I have seen a couple on the top, but not too many. The type on this drilling, takes a little bit thicker stock for proper fitting, and by putting it on top results in a little slimmer stock. Also, if shooting from a rest in a Kansel(sp) or Hochsitz, you don't have to turn the gun over to get a second cartridge. On the other hand, the type that opens from the end (,and the body is let into the stock), can more easily be fit to an extisting stock, and your face doesn't touch the metal . After years of using a cartridge trap( second type), I turned into a "non- believer" , a pouch in a side jacket pocket, is more convenient and doesn't rattle.
    Raimey,
    You can narrow the hs to a pool, if you make the pool large enough, you just can't ascribe it to a particular workman.
    Mike

  7. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by mike ford View Post
    Nathaniel,
    There are different advantages for putting the trap on either side. I have seen a couple on the top, but not too many. The type on this drilling, takes a little bit thicker stock for proper fitting, and by putting it on top results in a little slimmer stock. Also, if shooting from a rest in a Kansel(sp) or Hochsitz, you don't have to turn the gun over to get a second cartridge. On the other hand, the type that opens from the end (,and the body is let into the stock), can more easily be fit to an extisting stock, and your face doesn't touch the metal . After years of using a cartridge trap( second type), I turned into a "non- believer" , a pouch in a side jacket pocket, is more convenient and doesn't rattle.
    Raimey,
    You can narrow the hs to a pool, if you make the pool large enough, you just can't ascribe it to a particular workman.
    Mike
    I am humbled by the wealth of knowledge on these boards. Thank you. I have attached some pictures of the H S marking for review, and I also was curious about the 2712 numbering. It appears in two places one is visible in the second pic. I have seen where that was a reference on production date but only month and year so I wasn't sure on the 27 part? Any ideas?IMG_0064.jpgIMG_0065.jpg

  8. #18
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    TGM,
    Rather than production date, if it were dated, it would be the proof date. Usually, though, we date the guns by this date, even if not precisely correct. It is close enough for our purposes. The proof date would normally be near the bore diameter/case length, rather than where the 2712 is located. This is usually the location of the serial number, and if the second 2712 you found is on the receiver( normally on "water table"), then that is the serial number.
    Mike

  9. #19
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    Mike. Thanks for the update. The second place the 2712 appears is on the inside of the fore stock or fore arm. Nothing around the 8.9 mm 72 Does this have a relevance?

  10. #20
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    TGM,
    The serial number is also usually found on the forearm "iron", on the inside. Of course the main place for the serial number is the receiver, usually it is easily seen, but on some guns it may be hidden by the wood. I'm not recommending you disassemble it only to find the number.
    Mike

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