Page 4 of 5 FirstFirst ... 2345 LastLast
Results 31 to 40 of 41

Thread: Thieme und Schlegelmilch

  1. #31
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2018
    Posts
    16
    Well thank you Mike, I appreciate that. My plans for now are just to get things on paper, hunting in Southern California is a risk Iím just not willing to take (haha). My wife Linda and I are thinking hard on moving to Texas, in fact, we have a trip planned there the first week of April to get the lay of the land. If we do end up moving Iíll certainly rethink things and want to develope some hunting loads. Iím thinking that a chronograph is in my future just to get that accomplished. Iím also thinking that isnít going to be too hard to accomplish as the starting load Iím looking at should be in the area of 1700fps.

    Just checked the ballistic tables for a 165 grain RNSP .308 with a muzzle velocity of 1700fps gives maybe 813 foot pounds of energy at 100 yards. I believe a 357 Magnum with a 158 grain FMJ is in the area of 550 ft lbs. at the muzzle. That in itself I would think should do the trick on small deer wouldnít you think? And if I could crank things up o 2000fps I could be in the area of 1,136 ft lbs which should really do the job.

    Found a free ballistic calculator which kind of confirms what I found in my manual. Since I was limited to small library I chose a 170 grain RNSP.
    Attached Images Attached Images
    Last edited by Firpo; 02-07-2018 at 11:13 PM.

  2. #32
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2011
    Location
    East Alabama
    Posts
    1,856
    Firpo,
    If your starting load gives 1700 fps, your final load would likely be over that. Rather than the .308" bullet, I would suggest the new 32 Win. Special Flex Tip bullet, also at 165 gr. You could likely safely approach the velocity of the Special and that bullet is made to expand at that speed. I have no trouble getting 2150 fps with 170 gr .3215 bullet in my 8x57R/360. If you get 2000 fps with the Flex Tip bullet, a careful shot would kill a Whitetail graveyard dead. That would be a reasonable velocity(maybe conservative). My hunting load for the 8x72R was the 170gr(.318) bullet at about 2227 fps, but the rifle was nitro proofed. You don't need to shoot the hunting loads all the time to have fun.
    Mike

  3. #33
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2018
    Posts
    16
    Well Gents, looks like I have to put things on hold for a few weeks. I had a setback and the gun had to go to the doctor’s.....aka the gunsmith. Dog gonnit! I was cleaning all the nooks and crannies and while wiping off the extractor I had removed, the stem snapped right off in my hand. I took it to a person I know that’s a great tig welder and he did his best but the fix didn’t hold. Now it’s at the smith’s getting repaired properly. Grrrrrrrrrr

    It’ll all be okay I’m sure, just a setback that’s going to give me time to get things together. I’ll have all the components sitting ready when I get it back. Any of you ever break something that you wish you’d just left alone?
    Last edited by Firpo; 02-14-2018 at 06:57 PM.

  4. #34
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2011
    Location
    East Alabama
    Posts
    1,856
    Firpo,
    I would guess most of the oldest of us have. I have learned that there are not that many mistakes that you can make that you or someone else can't correct.
    Mike

  5. #35
    Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2014
    Location
    British Columbia, Canada
    Posts
    64
    I have a jeweller friend that does quite a bit of repair in his trade. He has all the small torches and jeweller lathes to make small repairs and build replacement parts. I'm just putting this out there for consideration as skilled trades people doing small repairs are jewellers in addition to welders.
    I had a small front sight from a shuetzen rifle that broke off. Yes he could braze it together but instead he made me a new one on his little lathe out of platinum. Nice and silvery like the original. (O.K. I loaned him my rototiller so he could do his garden.)
    Peter
    Last edited by Peter K; 02-14-2018 at 06:48 PM.

  6. #36
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2018
    Posts
    16
    Thanks guys. I tried a couple good jewelers in the area and that didn’t want to have a thing to do with me. Been very tempted to buy my own lathe, mill and tig welder. I figured I could take some machining classes and practice practice practice and I could make my own repairs.

  7. #37
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2011
    Location
    East Alabama
    Posts
    1,856
    Firpo,
    In my opinion a lathe( and mill) is a requirement of life. You can learn a lot from You Tube, I recommend Lyle Peterson, "Mr Pete 222"( a retired High School shop teacher), Adam Booth on "Abom79", and Keith Rucker on "Vintage Machinery". You can call them up by the name of the channel or by their name. There are a lot of others, but these do a very good job of explaining things. Good luck, make chips.
    Mike

  8. #38
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2012
    Location
    Between Rolla, St. James and Salem, Missouri
    Posts
    706
    I better write those names down...

    A lathe is like a loader on a tractor....and an ox/acetylene torch. Once you have one you wonder how on earth you got along without it...and I'm not much of a lathe operator.

  9. #39
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2015
    Location
    I live near Quakertown, Pennsylvania
    Posts
    513
    Ran a few numbers for the 8x72R Sauer with a 165 grain Lyman RN cast and looking to get approximately 1700 fps in a 24" barrel and the numbers come out like this:

    Accurate 5744 ( Mike's suggestion) = 21.0 grains

    Fill = 40.3%
    Pmax = 14,504 psi
    Vel = 1712 fps
    Burn = 90.9%
    Eff = 23.1%

    Alliant RL-7 = 26.0 grains

    Fill = 49.3%
    Pmax = 14,317 psi
    Vel = 1748 fps
    Burn = 90.3%
    Eff = 23.5%

    These are calculated figures so use your own discretion.

    Diz

  10. #40
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2018
    Posts
    16
    I really appreciate all of you being so willing to help.

    Great Info. Right now I’m looking at a move to Tx in the next 6-12 months so I’m thinking I should hold off on the capital equipment expenditures till after the move.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •